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ELECTRO FUNK,DISCO: Giorgio Moroder – Midnight Express/The Chase Theme (RARE1978 Original Extended 14 Min Mix)


Download Original Epic 14 Min Version thanks to (DJ Philippe B ONLINE)

Also came accross this Nu-Disco remix; Giorgio Moroder VS Martin Brodin-The Chase 2011 (Martin Brodin Remix)

Download @ Phonica Records

Hansjörg “Giorgio” Moroder (on record sleeves often only Giorgio) (born 26 April 1940, Gröden,

Electronic Dreams: Giorgio Moroder Film + Musi...

Image by 92YTribeca via Flickr

Italy) is an Italian record producer, songwriter and performer based in Los Angeles. When in Munich in the 1970s, he started his own record label called Oasis Records, which several years later became a subdivision of Casablanca Records. His work with synthesizers during the 1970s and 1980s had a significant influence on New Wave, house, techno and electronic music in general. Particularly well known for his work with Donna Summer during the era of disco (including “Love to Love You Baby” and “I Feel Love“), Moroder is the founder of the former Musicland Studios in Munich, which was used as a recording studio for artists including Electric Light Orchestra, Led Zeppelin, Queen and Elton John.

In addition to producing several hits with Donna Summer, Moroder also produced a number of electronic disco hits for The Three Degrees, two albums for Sparks, and a score of songs for a variety of others including David Bowie, Irene Cara, Madleen Kane, Melissa Manchester, Blondie, Japan, and France Joli.

Music career

Moroder made his first steps in music in Berlin, Germany by releasing a few singles under the name “Giorgio” beginning in 1966, singing in Italian (as George, to explain his German accent), Spanish, English, and German. He came to prominence in 1969, when his recording “Looky Looky”, released on Ariola Records, was awarded a gold disc in October 1970.Often collaborating with lyricist Pete Bellotte, Moroder had a number of hits in his own name including “Son of My Father” in 1972 before releasing the synthesizer-driven From Here to Eternity, a notable chartbuster in 1977, and in the following year releasing “Chase“, the theme from the film Midnight Express. These songs achieved some chart success in the UK, the U.S., and across Europe, and everywhere disco-mania was spreading. The full movie score for Midnight Express won him his first Academy Award for best film score in 1978. In 1979, Moroder released his album E=MC². Text on the album’s cover stated that it was the “first electronic live-to-digital album.” He also released three albums between 1977-1979 under the name Munich Machine.

In 1984, Moroder worked with Philip Oakey of The Human League to make the album Philip Oakey & Giorgio Moroder; which was a UK singles chart hit with “Together in Electric Dreams“, title track to the 1984 movie Electric Dreams. In 1986, Moroder collaborated with his protégé Harold Faltermeyer (of “Axel F.” fame) and lyricist Tom Whitlock to create the score for the film Top Gun (1986), with the most noteworthy hit being Berlin‘s “Take My Breath Away“. “Chase” was also used as an entrance theme for wrestling’s group The Midnight Express. In 1987, Moroder produced Falco‘s song “Body Next to Body”.

In 1997, Moroder and Donna Summer won the Grammy Award for Best Dance Recording for the song “Carry On”.

On 20 September 2004 Moroder was honored at the Dance Music Hall of Fame ceremony, held in New York, when he was inducted for his many outstanding achievements and contributions as producer. In 2005, he was given the title of Commendatore by the then President of the Italian Republic, Carlo Azeglio Ciampi. On September 5, 2010 Moroder received the Great Order of Merit of the South Tyrol.

Film work

Moroder won three Academy Awards: Best Original Score for Midnight Express (1978); Best Song for “Flashdance…What a Feeling“, from the film Flashdance (1983); and Best Song for “Take My Breath Away“, from Top Gun (1986).

Moroder also won two of his three Grammy Awards for “Flashdance”: Best Album Of Original Score Written For A Motion Picture Or A Television Special and Best Instrumental Composition, for the track “Love Theme from Flashdance”.

In 1984, Moroder compiled a new restoration and edit of the famous silent film Metropolis and provided a contemporary soundtrack to the film. This soundtrack includes seven pop music tracks from Pat Benatar, Jon Anderson, Adam Ant, Billy Squier, Loverboy, Bonnie Tyler and Freddie Mercury. He also integrated the old-fashioned intertitles into the film as subtitles as a means of improving continuity, and he also played the film at a rate of 24 frames per second. Since the original speed was unknown this choice was controversial. Known as the “Moroder version”, it sparked debate among film buffs, with outspoken critics and supporters of the film falling into equal camps.

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